Close Read and Idioms… (Quiz over chapters 1 and 2 tomorrow!)

THIS JUST IN!  Tomorrow morning at 7:45 I will hold a tutorial session about parts of speech for those of you who scored a 11 or lower on last week’s quiz.  From there you can schedule a retake.  OR you may take a slip and study at home with a parent.

 

Today we’re doing our first “close read” from an excerpt of Chapter 1 for OMAM.  If you were absent here is the sheet (ignore the faulty numbering):

Read the passage below.  Read it at least three times (it’s very short) and look for details you may have missed the first time you read it.

“Lennie knelt and looked over the fire at the angry George.  And Lennie’s face was drawn with terror.  ‘An’ whatta I got,’ George went on furiously.  ‘I got you!  You can’t keep a job and you lose me ever’ job I get.  Jus’ keep me shovin’ all over the country all of the time. An’ that ain’t the worst.  You get in trouble.  You do bad things and I got to get you out’” (11).

  1. What feelings do you have toward George when you read this scene?
  1. What does the fact that “Lennie knelt” tell us about the power between George and Lennie?  What does it tell us about the mood of this scene?
  1. Why do you think Lennie is “drawn with terror”?  Why is he so afraid?
  1. Lennie “lose[s]” George’s job.  Why is that a good verb to use here?
  1. George says he is “shovin’ all over the country.”  What is the feeling behind that phrase?
  1. What feelings do you have toward George when you read this scene?

Next:  Idioms–a figure of speech not meant to be taken literally.

Examples:  It’s raining cats and dogs.  The early bird gets the worm.  Notice that these are often cliches as well.  Today we have a sheet where we look at various idioms and you have to try and figure out what they mean.  They are common in the vernacular of our characters in Of Mice and MenHere is a webpage that has an option on the left to see the idioms in various chapters.

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